randomactsofchaos:

Matt Wuerker/Politico (03/08/2013)

randomactsofchaos:

Matt Wuerker/Politico (03/08/2013)

(via political-cartoons)

its-salah:


Homeless mother who sent six-year-old son to better school in the wrong town jailed for five years
A mother who pleaded guilty to fraudulently enrolling her six-year-old son in the wrong school district has been sentenced to five years in prison.
Tonya McDowell sent her son to an elementary school in Norwalk, Connecticut, instead of her home city of Bridgeport.
The 34-year-old, who was homeless when she was charged with felony larceny last year, said she wanted the best education possible for the boy.
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2108733/Homeless-mother-Tanya-McDowell-sent-son-6-better-school-wrong-town-jailed-years.html#ixzz2MmOPkvDf

Sad, sad, sad, the right to equal education does not exist(which in itself is illegal). To want to have equal rights has yet again become illegal apparently like in the days of racial oppression.

its-salah:

Homeless mother who sent six-year-old son to better school in the wrong town jailed for five years

A mother who pleaded guilty to fraudulently enrolling her six-year-old son in the wrong school district has been sentenced to five years in prison.

Tonya McDowell sent her son to an elementary school in Norwalk, Connecticut, instead of her home city of Bridgeport.

The 34-year-old, who was homeless when she was charged with felony larceny last year, said she wanted the best education possible for the boy.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2108733/Homeless-mother-Tanya-McDowell-sent-son-6-better-school-wrong-town-jailed-years.html#ixzz2MmOPkvDf

Sad, sad, sad, the right to equal education does not exist(which in itself is illegal). To want to have equal rights has yet again become illegal apparently like in the days of racial oppression.

(Source: coffeeandfaith)

ilikearchitecture:

How Ink is Made. A must watch video.

doctorswithoutborders:

Current treatment for dr-tb is complex and inadequate. For the first time in half a century drugs that could cure DR-TB are being tested, but the global health community needs to act fast.

Drug-resistant tuberculosis: we can stop this epidemic in its tracks
This article was originally published on The Guardian

DR-TB is a public health crisis that is spiralling out of control – the latest statistics from the World Health Organisation suggest more than 300,000 new cases every year among notified TB cases, a figure that Medecins Sans Frontieres/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) considers conservative based on the growing number of DR-TB patients in our projects. Once the preserve of people who had received incomplete or incorrect TB treatment, a growing number of people with DR-TB are presenting who have never had TB treatment before, which shows that DR-TB is becoming an epidemic in its own right.

Yet, the tools to tackle the disease remain woefully inadequate. People with DR-TB are forced to take up to 20 pills a day with excruciating side effects that range from deafness to nausea and psychosis. For healthcare professionals, the treatment is complex: individualised for each patient based on drug resistance patterns, and expensive, with drugs alone costing up to $ 6,000 (£3,962) per person for a treatment course. And even then, patients only have a 50% chance of cure.

However, after half a century of neglect there is a historic opportunity for change. The drug pipeline for TB is the best it has ever been, with 10 drugs in clinical testing. At the very end of 2012, the US Food and Drug Administration approved bedaquiline or Sirturo, the first dedicated new TB drug since 1963, while another drug, delamanid is currently undergoing review by the European Medicines Agency. Both drugs arecompletely new classes of antibiotics with no reported resistance, and represent an unprecedented opportunity to improve treatment for DR-TB.

So what do these developments mean for global health professionals – particularly those on the front-line treating TB in communities?

These new drugs could be game-changers and the TB community must urgently work out how best to use them. They offer the potential to make DR-TB treatment shorter, more effective and more tolerable, with fewer side effects. The first step is to make these new drugs available for research and ensure they are quickly registered in high-burden countries. The manufacturers must also make sure the drugs are affordable in low- and middle-income countries, eg through generic production.

The response of drug manufacturers to generic HIV drugs is perhaps the best incentive to do things differently with DR-TB: before the introduction of generic competition in 2001, antiretrovirals to treat HIV cost over US$10,000 per person per year and very few people in developing countries could afford that. As a result, millions of people died and the peak of AIDS related-deaths didn’t occur until 2005. Since 2001, the price has come down nearly 99% and people now have access to affordable medicines. With eight million people now on treatment, the curve of AIDS related-deaths has started to fall, but we still need to expand access to a total of 15 million people by 2015. New infections are also falling.

(via its-salah)

unicef:

VIDEO REPORT: Normalcy through schools
Adjusting to life in a camp in the Niger is difficult, for Malian refugee children - but school provides a place to learn, play and forge friendships.

You can read more about the Malian refugee situation (and how UNICEF is getting involved) by visiting UNICEF.org.

(via its-salah)

its-salah:

That’s why I laugh at people who think to label Liberals as progressives, what Liberals are, are in political terms are people who appease the masses to gain control but don’t do most of what they promise.

Both parties are in totality the same.

(Source: eltigrechico)

(Source: torevolution, via its-salah)

Somali rape survivor jailed

shespeaksoflove:

Summary:

Lul Ali Osman, a 27 year old mother of five and a rape survivor was detained by Somalia’s Criminal Investigation Department (CID) after speaking to a journalist about the five uniformed government officials who allegedly gang raped her at gun point.

The UN estimates more than 1,100 cases of sexual violence were reported in Somalia in 2012 ( obviously this figure is much higher in reality).

The Somali president, Sheikh Mohamud is known to have said he will crack down on sexual violence and any person convicted of rape will be ‘put to death’.

Ms Osman was forced to publicly retract her claims after being interrogated for two days by police without legal counsel.

Ms Osman will spend a year in prison after the court decided there was insufficient evidence of rape. The ‘evidence’ was a pregnancy test carried out on Ms Osman that yielded negative results therefore the court decided she in fact was not raped.

This complete disregard for a woman’s testimony as well as witnesses brought forth is sending the wrong message to perpetrators of sexual and gender based violence, especially in situations of vulnerability.

In any sexual an gender based violence case, especially against government forces the victims testimony is a show of bravery and courage and should be awarded the highest possible praise rather than punishment.

Ms Osman’s husband is reported to have said that this case is like the Somali saying ‘miskiin baa misko la fuulo leh’ the weak give way to the strong.

(Source: haqiqaht, via its-salah)

courtneycascadian:

  • Part 2 of the 2 part series O.B.A.M.A. (Ongoing Battle Against Middle America) in which certain solutions and alternatives to participating in the system are put forth for those who don’t buy into the notion that it’s possible for Americans to vote their way out of 2nd class citizenship.
  • Plus Bonus Outtake footage

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